Motion of the lunar nodes confirms the TYCHOS

MOTION OF THE LUNAR NODES CONFIRMS THE TYCHOS

Dear all, today I decided to take a closer look at the observed ‘retrograde’ motion of the lunar nodes. It turned out to be a most interesting affair.

“The lunar nodes are points at which the Moon’s orbit crosses the ecliptic. (…). The line of nodes, the intersection between the two respective planes, has a retrograde motion: for an observer on Earth, it rotates westward along the ecliptic with a period of 18.6 years or 19.3549° per year. When viewed from the celestial north, the nodes move clockwise around Earth, opposite to Earth’s own spin and its revolution around the Sun.” Lunar node - Wikipedia

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Caption of this diagram from the Wikipedia: “The lunar nodes are the two points where the Moon’s orbital path crosses the ecliptic, the Sun’s apparent yearly path on the celestial sphere.”
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So let’s see: the annual ‘clockwise’ motion of the lunar nodes is 19.3549°, which is 5.37636 % of 360°.

In the TYCHOS model, the annual distance covered by the Earth-Moon system (as it revolves ‘clockwise’ around the PVP orbit) is 14036km. Hence, in 18.6 years it moves by 18.6 x 14036km = 261069.6 km.

Now, we see that 5.37636 % of 261069.6 km = 14036.04 km

We may therefore conclude what follows:

The annual (‘clockwise’) rotational rate of the Moon’s nodes is commensurate with the annual (‘clockwise’) motion of the Earth-Moon system – as stipulated by the TYCHOS model.

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Simon,

Let me try to rephrase this. The ‘nodes’ travel around earth 180 degrees out from one another all the way around the ‘clock face’? i.e. 12 & 6, 1 & 7, 2 & 8 etc.?

I think I get it. This phenomena is what causes the eclipses to move around the globe isn’t it?

Can you create a graphic that depicts this? (you’re probably already working on it :rofl:)

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Dear Schoepffer,

Here’s my first attempt at illustrating this issue with a graphic. Hope it helps! :slight_smile:

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The fact that the lunar nodes ‘tick annually by one unit’ of their 18.6-year 360° rotation (i.e. every 14036km of the Earth-Moon system’s motion) should perhaps not come as a surprise. As I illustrated in Chapter 13 of my book, the so-called exeligmos cycle of 54.1 years is completed when the Earth-Moon system has covered the distance of the Moon’s orbital diameter:

“An exeligmos (Greek: ἐξέλιγμος — turning of the wheel) is a period of 54 years + 33 days that can be used to predict successive eclipses with similar properties and location. For a solar eclipse, after every exeligmos a solar eclipse of similar characteristics will occur in a location close to the eclipse before it. For a lunar eclipse the same part of the earth will view an eclipse that is very similar to the one that occurred one exeligmos before it.”

I read your conversation today at Hastro. I followed two of those links also. I wanted to post some from one but I will paraphrase here. They say something like this, “Let’s pretend the moon’s orbit is circular, there are no perturbations, the sun orbits the earth, etc.”

And all I can do is laugh not because they must use a non-heliocentric model for anything to work but because it doesn’t even phase them! :rofl:

I video’d a lunar eclipse in 2022


lunar eclipse 8 Nov 2022

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